Category Archives: General Info

PLAYER PROFILE: TANK

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Tank is a tremendous asset as a player and as a league member. A fierce competitor and a “roll” model athlete, Tank makes people want to be better. To support Tank’s journey as a Dolly Roger, please visit the Dolly Rogers’ gofundme page or keep an eye on the team’s schedule this season. Coming out to games is the best support we could ask for!

Name and number: Tank, 7

Why: During fresh meat and my first few Dolly Roger’s practices I wore this

ridiculous Boeri ski helmet from the 80s. Whips and Chaynes said I looked like Tank

Girl and it stuck. I loved the idea of being given a name rather than choosing one.

Likes: hummus, proving that size doesn’t matter, post game beer, anything agility

Dislikes: going slow, Chinese food

Why did you join roller derby: I grew up playing competitive soccer and hockey

from an early age and was fortunate enough to receive a scholarship to boarding

school in Connecticut to finish high school and play sports. I really knew little else

but team life, camaraderie, training, and hard work until I said goodbye to team

sports after a year of lacrosse in college. Ten years and many miles travelled later, I

found myself back in Ottawa itching to be part of a team again and wanting a new

challenge. My wife encouraged me to give it a try and I can still remember grinning

like crazy at that Open House four years ago when I was skating around. I had found

just what I was looking for. It felt amazingly familiar yet new and exciting and

everyone was ridiculously welcoming.

How do you train: I don’t love traditional gyms. I’m a huge fan of plyometrics, HIIT

(high intensity interval training), tabata, interval running and yoga. I train fast and

hard focusing on speed, agility, and bursts of power. Small but mighty!

tank

Why do you keep playing: I absolutely love team sports and the idea of different

people coming together to achieve a common goal. The camaraderie is great. This

sport allows me to embrace my competitiveness and also pushes me physically and

mentally to be the best athlete I can be. It’s inclusive and revolutionary and amazing

to be a part of.

Favorite derby moment: Beating the Montreal Sexpos this season because it was

great to see our hard work as Dolly Rogers pay off, and playing in the Team Canada

tryout scrimmage because it was a great learning opportunity and I felt honoured to

be on the track with Canada’s finest.

When I’m not playing derby: I love my team and this game but think balance is

important for my mental game. When I’m not practicing, playing, coaching the

Bacon Pirates or training, I’m hiking in the woods with my wife and crazy boxer,

eating delicious food, spending time with my nieces, planning my next adventure,

and studying/training to become a firefighter.

Pre-game ritual: I like to sleep in a bit and then go on a nice long walk with my dog

and wife. It gets my legs going and clears my mind. I do some yoga and stretching

and take my time packing my gear bag (I have to have the right socks). I drink coffee,

lots of water, and usually eat a sandwich. I can get worked up quickly so I try to stay

calm and mellow at the rink. And I always put my jersey on at the last second – game

time!

What about gear: I’ve gone through a number of different skates. I have small feet

and tiny ankles and found it hard to find the perfect boot that wasn’t a hockey skate.

I skate on Antiks right now and I like them, but am still looking for that perfect boot.

I use Prodesigned kneepads,a Bauer hockey helmet, and the rest is Atom gear. As

Dawn Cherry knows, I’m still looking for the tiniest slimmest kneepad!

How has derby affected the way you live your life: At 31 I didn’t think I would be in

better shape than my 19 year old self. This game makes me want to be healthier and

stronger. I’m also learning how to curb my performance anger, something I never

addressed as a younger athlete, so I can be the best teammate I can be.

 

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Player Profile: Lady Mayhem

My derby name is Lady Mayhem, or to my children Mommy Mayhem, and my husband helped me pick out my derby number, which is 53 (since I’m a super tall 5’3). I am currently sitting track-side with my foot elevated while I recover from an ankle injury..but soon will be back playing for the Beauty School Dropouts, Dollinquents and training with the Dolly Rogers.

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After having my two kids I needed an outlet-something that let me exercise, meet people and get out a bit. A friend mentioned she was going to see a game so I tagged along and FELL in love…it was love at first site… I kept saying, “Yep, I need to do this.” I may have messaged my husband 15 or so times with things like, ‘must do this’ and ‘found out you start with a fresh meat training course’ and ‘one just started..Damnit… But wait maybe I can join late.’ I completed fresh meat and found that my skating background with ringette helped a bit and I slowly got the hang of derby.

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I love this sport because…it’s awesome! So much to learn…so much to try…so much personal growth space…and that moment when you have something click and/or work out better than you ever pictured…it’s just amazing!

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I am entering my third season of derby but I still don’t have a favourite personal moment. I had some fun jamming for my previous home team and some good times on the road with my old travel team. I made a switch to CCDD this year and have been blown away with the coaching help I’ve received. I am super bummed to not be skating at the moment, as I am missing valuable learning opportunities. In summary…I play because‎…it’s awesome!

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Player Profile: Kaio-kensi

Derby Name: Kaio-kensi

Number: 6
I play on my house league team the Bacon Pirates, CCDD’s WFTDA charter team the Dolly Rogers, and Team Ontario. I was recruited to play roller derby (along with Labrosse) by a couple of dudes on our recreational Ultimate frisbee team who were friends with my neighbour (Kent from Team Canada Men’s Roller Derby 2014 and Morson from Team Canada 2016) and I was kind of shy / nervous about starting a new sport in my late 20s so I convinced my derby wife Fish N Hits to try it with me.
Kens and Laurel
Many bad fashion choices and gear upgrades later (from a poorly fitting bicycle helmet and neon children’s L.A. Gear elbow pads straight from the 90s to a well-rounded set of 187 pads and a proper helmet), I finally passed my minimum skills test and played in my first roller derby scrimmage, which was a Team Canada fundraiser where we skated in anti-derby direction.
Kens Can
I spent the better part of my childhood and adolescence as a figure skater with Olympic dreams, so being back on skates as a full-time athlete feels like I’ve come home. It’s also important to me that this sport celebrates queer women and provides a safe space and impetus for dialogue in the greater sports community concerning gender identity and expression. People just get to play “the version and composition of roller derby with which they most closely identify”, simple as that.
Kens Queer
One of my favourite roller derby memories is going to the Fresh and the Furious tournament in 2014 as the captain of CCDD’s team of newbies, the Cannon Dolls, and making it through the whole day to a thrilling final jam where we ended up taking the championship.
Kens Fresh
My derby name, Kaio-kensi, is a throw-back to my days of watching Dragon Ball Z with my little sister in our shared bedroom on an old VCR or when it came on YTV. The Kaio-ken is a fighting technique invented by King Kai where you have a sudden massive upsurge of energy, where your power, speed, hearing, and vision improve dramatically, but you can only sustain it for a short time. As a child, I was bullied a lot, and superhero stories were always a welcomed escape from reality and coping strategy. So, in a way, my derby identity provides me with a powerful visualization tool for the short, intense jams we play on the track and it allows me to honour my personal journey.
Kens Glam.png
When I started skating I went by the number X7 (before letters were illegal), because a “Kaio-ken x7” is a near-impossible feat, and also in honour of my grandmother – I was her 7th sweet pea home from the hospital. She passed away unexpectedly the year before I started playing derby and it was still bearing heavy on my heart, so I wanted to feel like she was always with me at my back.
When I had to change my number, after much toiling, I went with 6, because in numerology, it is the most harmonious number – symbolic of caring, sacrificing, healing, protecting, and teaching others. While it is important to ramp it up and play at my personal best, the needs of my team have to come first. The things that the number 6 represents remind me of my mother and the things I admire most about her, and meditating on its meaning helps me feel balanced as a player.
So really, derby to me is about being part of a strong and supportive grassroots movement and community that plays an exhilarating full contact sport. It is truly a privilege that I get to share the track with my leaguemates and all those who we travel to visit or welcome to the capital. My goal is to always have fun, to show respect for my teammates and opponents, and to express my gratitude openly to all the volunteers, officials, and fans who make it all possible and worthwhile.
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CCDD’s First Double Header

CCDD’s been steadily expanding in the last three years, but this past year represents our most intense spike in membership of well…ever. For us. As such, we have not just one, but two new teams. The thing about teams is that they like to play so the rest of our events this season will be double headers.  So, double the fun.

So first of all, let me introduce you to the:

Dollinquents

and

Slaughter Squad

If you clicked on the links, you probably noticed that Slaughter Squad has a bunch of dudes on it. There’s a simple explanation for that: they’re dudes.  CCDD is helping these guys out until there are enough of them to be fully independent. Frankly, given what they do for us, it’s the least we can do. A lot of these guys coach, ref, volunteer at our games, or have lost a significant other to the sport and they’re coping by playing.

The Dollinquents had one game last year and are starting this season with an away game in Cornwall against the Seaway Roller Derby Girls’ Power Dames. You’ll be able to catch the Dollinquents in Ottawa on August 10 and September 7.

But don’t worry about waiting until August for derby action. CCDD’s first double header take place Saturday, July 6, 2013. The fun kicks off at 6:30 at Barbara Ann Scott Arena, featuring the Dolly Rogers against Kingston’s Disloyalists. Following a super quick intermission (a quick staff swap…players becoming refs, refs becoming players), the Slaughter Squad will be taking on Montreal’s Mont Royals. Tickets for this awesome, amazing, super fun event are $12 in advance. You can buy tickets online here because Shopify, our awesome sponsor, made this possible. If you wait to get them at the door, they’ll cost you $15. As usual, under 12ers get in free.

Some nitty gritty: bring ID. We’re sponsored by Beau’s.  There will be food. There will be awesome merch. If you wanna sit by the track, bring a camping chair and hang out. Make signs. Be prepared to be loud. You will have so much fun, it’ll hurt your face. In a good way.

Four teams, two games, so much derby, your face will hurt!

Four teams, two games, so much derby, your face will hurt!

See you there!

Plower

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Double C to the double D…we be rollin’ in the 613

CCDD is getting their third bouting season under way. We’ve grown so much over the past few years, and we’re incredibly excited about the future.

In addition to the Dolly Rogers and their plot for world domination, we’re announcing our newest team, the Dollinquents, who will be hitting the track in June for a few away games in the neighbourhood. They’ll be bouting at home in August and September, so make sure to check out our schedule.  You do not want to miss any of it.

CCDD's newest team! Welcome to the family!

CCDD’s newest team! Welcome to the family!

Shopify

We’ve also got a whole bunch of amazing new sponsors. Have you been to our website www.capitalcityderbydolls.com or our facebook page lately? Did you notice that you can now buy merch and bout tickets? That’s all because of Shopify. Have you seen the Dolly Rogers’ new S-One Lifer helmets? We’re taking our sponsor with us wherever we go!

Burbs Pub & Eatery

When we’re in Kanata, our favourite place to hang out is The Burbs on Hazeldean.  You can often find us hanging out there after practice, having a pint of local Beau’s Beer and some yummy snacks.  They’re also super at catering to the vegans in our league. If you want a salad wrap with guacamole, with a side salad, also with guacamole, they will do it for you. Because they’re just that awesome. You should give them a visit.  Tell ‘em we sent you!

FATBOYS

We’ve also just found a new hangout in the market. Fatboys Southern Smokehouse on Murray Street has great bbq and live music on Saturday nights. We’ll be bringing our after bout parties there in June and July, if you need a ringing endorsement.

Capital City Derby Dolls are still dedicated to developing new skaters and keeping an active house league program. We’ve got in-house scrimmages planned for June, August, and September. Keep an eye on our facebook page for an invitation to come and watch your favourite new skaters KABD.

We couldn’t have done it without our fans, our friends, our skaters and our sponsors. Sponsors like Michael Lewicki, Hedges Sutherland Law Firm, Boxall Heating (boxallheating.com), Bigger Beards for Brighter Tomorrows, and Neon Skates have been there for us since day 1 and we can’t find enough ways to say thank you to them.

We hope to see you at our home opener on Saturday at Jack Charron Arena in Kanata. You can buy tickets online at capitalcityderbydolls.com!

Carpe Beardem

Hedges and Sutherland

Michael Lewicki S-ONE

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Mounting New Plates

After skating on nylon plates since I first took up derby in 2009 I decided it was time for a change. Finally. Now, deciding it was time for a change and making the change are too different things. The world of derby and derby skates and all that go with them is a pretty specific market. It’s definitely challenging to try gear before you buy it, especially when it comes to skate plates.

So, of course I turned to the Internet to get some kind of definitive answer about plates… And discovered this is a bit like turning to “Doctor” Google when you have a headache and then become convinced that you are clearly about to die from an aneurysm. There is a whole whack of information out there about skate plates. So, the research began…. And then at derby events this past season I spent much downtime between games talking to different vendors and skate techs to get some input. This of course just showed me that if you ask three different people then you’re still getting three different opinions. Not much consensus on the whole and still not leaving me with any kind of clear decision or even a clear direction.

I had figured having skated for a couple years now on the nylon plates that I’d have a pretty good idea of what I wanted in a plate- and on one hand I do, but on the other hand before making the investment into plates I wanted to be able to try them. At the end of September I got that very opportunity.

I went to the Sugarbush Showdown in Essex Junction VT- WFTDA’s East Region Playoffs with U Kent Do That to enjoy a weekend of good derby. Pretty much watching the pros of the sport. Between games we wandered the vendors, and I started up with questions about plates. And what we found was that one of the booths, Crazy Skates (http://www.skatesus.com/store/index.php?cPath=91), actually came equipped. They had Crazy skates in all sizes with the Crazy Venus plate mounted (http://www.skatesus.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=91_107&products_id=351). Excitement to no end. The rep, Malice B. Stopless (http://www.facebook.com/people/Malice-B-Stopless/100001748125994), was awesome. U Kent Do That and I visited that booth repeatedly. We tried on the same skates over and over. Asked endless questions. And even brought in our own skates–because who leaves home without their skates?–and so I would wear one of my skates and one of the Crazy skates and do a direct comparison. Trying out transitions, turns, even the eagle. Malice answered all our questions and was more than patient with both of us every time we came over.

The funny thing to me about the Crazy Skates booth was that they were set up as a part of the Bruised Boutique (http://www.bruisedboutique.com/) store which is where I actually originally purchased my current derby skates a couple summers ago.

By the end of the weekend my decision regarding plates was made. Now, this wasn’t solely on just having been able to try them, there was a little more to it than that- hence all the questions and why I repeatedly tried the skates on. It’s much harder part to describe exactly why I went with these plates. It comes down to a few things like skating style, the positions you play in derby, what you want out of your skates etc., plus the nuances of how I skate and then in a sense the more abstract pieces, like the way that I walk, so the way that I balance myself. I have for most of my life walked on my tippy toes so that was a factor in picking plates and then what size of plate and then placement of plate. Just when you think you’ve got one piece of the plate puzzle figured out, up comes another…

A little DIY surgery, and a lot of patience

This Thanksgiving Monday I gave thanks by buying my Crazy Venus plates from the lovely Georgia W. Tush of Neon Skates (www.skateneon.com). Neon was also a vendor at Sugarbush Showdown and Georgia let me and U Kent Do That know that her store would be carrying Crazy Skates stock. And on Monday she found herself in Ottawa working on the soon to open in Ottawa Neon Skates.

For the actual drilling and physical mounting of the plates, I really have to give the full credit to U Kent Do That. The placement and positioning was certainly a team effort and for that I knew what wanted but the actual mounting was a whole other story indeed….

Of course I went back to the Internet to find out more about positioning and mounting. My best resources for mounting were this derby girl’s 2 blog entries on the topic- http://diaryofarollergirl.wordpress.com/2012/01/20/diy-big-kid-customization-part-i-selecting-roller-skate-plates/ and http://diaryofarollergirl.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/diy-big-kid-customization-part-ii-installing-roller-skate-plates/ plus Sin City DIY plate mounting http://www.sincityskates.com/images/downloads/sincity_diy_plate_mounting.pdf. These resources really gave me good handle on what needed to be done, and so I decided to also document this experiment.

So, the before pictures… skates sans wheels, all ready for surgery…. And clean wheels and clean bearings for afterwards…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My set of supplies

Pencil to mark where the position of the nylon plate

Rules to measure and find the new centre line

Polish to shine up my skates

Polyfilla for the holes

The next step was to trace the position of the original plate.

Then the removal of the old plates.

Four bolts on each skate holding in the plate. A screwdriver and a wrench as tools for plate removal. Plate off the first skate, no problem. Last bolt holding in the plate of the other skate would just not come off. Stripped the nut and the bolt in this struggle, before getting a Dremmel to just cut the bolt off. If you wind up with this problem- safety glasses are a must!!

Finally, the old plates were off and the skates actually cleaned up. Polyfilla in to fill the existing holes and give us a ‘blank’ canvas to work on.

Now came the time for the placement of the new plates. First was determining the centerline for my boots. Best resources for that- http://quadskating.com/skates/centering-plates.htm. Basically, it comes down to where the space between your second and third toe are. So, out came the ruler and the markings. We fine tuned my centerline by measuring between two points of where the old plates were and then joining up those two points with a centerline offset by the centerline between my second and third toe.

Next, the position of the mount. After much talking and reading I had come to the conclusion that I might (would?) benefit from a forward mount.

I’d’ve chosen a short forward mount- essentially getting a plate that’s smaller than what you would normally skate on and then mounting them more towards the front of your boot to force you to stay on the balls of your feet. However, since I was already on the smallest plate this wasn’t something I could do. In effect there wasn’t all that much space to play with.

So, in that respect I had it a little easy, I have little feet, therefore little skates, and therefore the smallest plate available so less agonizing about whether of not I should do a forward mount or a short forward mount. Even with a forward mount, it’s not too dramatic and there isn’t that much empty space at my heel ultimately.

A little information on where to mount plates-

http://quadskating.com/skates/mounting-plates.htm

http://www.derbylife.com/articles/2011/11/ask_expert_plate_mounting_shortforward_vs_standard_mounting 

We taped my new plates in place- trucks, wheels, stopper, and all. And I stood up and pranced around trying to get as best a feel as I could. Up on my toes and all the rest. So far, so good.

I honestly thought that at this point the hard part was over and that drilling the holes and fitting the plate was going to be a quick job. Hahahahaha, goes to show what I know!

Ultimately, it just comes down to the mounting hardware and probably not ever having done it before. U Kent Do that and I dove right into this. I held the skate steady while he drilled and then it came to trying to fit (aka shove) all the bolts through the new holes and fitting. The one good thing was that all the holes in the skate boot were properly aligned with the holes in the plate (yay!).

More difficult was getting the hole just wide enough to get everything all the way through so the plate could actually bolted to the skate. Out came the Dremmel again to widen the tops of the holes.

Now, the mounting hardware that came with the Venus plates included shorter bolts than what typically come with mounting hardware for other plates. Crazy had wanted make life easier for people who would mount plates and so had cut down the bolts already thus hopefully saving people from having to saw off the extra bit of bolt with a Dremmel or other bolt saw. And I’m sure the bolts are a perfect size for a Crazy boot, but I have a Riedell 265 boot. So, unfortunately, this meant that the bolts had to be just so if we wanted to fit the washer and the bolt on and actually finish the mounting. And this is where U Kent Do That very patiently went about the small adjustments to make the bolts fit just right.

With one skate pretty much done and mounted we called it a night for mounting. My suggestion on this was before going at my other skate the next day that a trip to the hardware store could save us (and by ‘us’ I meant my skate tech…) a little frustration. But a longer bolt that’d still fit the plate and then use the Dremmel to trim off the extra at the end…

And the next day U Kent Do That was back at it. A little under the gun by me since we had practice in Rockland that night… eeek! No luck on getting a longer bolt so right back at the skate the same way as the day before. But with yesterday’s knowledge the assembly went better. Both skates all ready for practice.

Eastern Block’her

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CCDD WANTS YOU

Give it a shot!

At my football game last night, I watched a girl knock a few bitches down. I shouted, “HEY! Wanna play roller derby?” at her and then rammed the CCDD email address into her hand. Do you knock bitches down? Do you wanna knock bitches down? Do you know girls who could knock bitches down or dudes who want to try men’s derby? THE TIME HAS COME. CCDD is recruiting. We’re looking for people, THAT’S RIGHT, PEOPLE, 18 years of age and up, who want to get involved in this crazy ride as players, referees or eager volunteers. Volunteers can be under 18.

But…but…I don’t know how to skate?

Whatever. We spend the off-season teaching you how to skate, then how to play.

I don’t have skates?

WAH! You can rent them from us. We hardly charge for rentals…just enough to keep the skates maintained.

But…um…I’m not sure I’m cut out for this.

That’s a fair comment. Which is why we’re having an Open House. Actually, we’re having two. On Sunday, September 23, 2012, and the following Sunday, September 30, 2012, from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m., at the Belltown Dome on 2915 Haughton Ave., so you can come and try it out and THEN decide if you could maybe, JUST MAYBE, play derby.

How does it work?

Well, you give us $15.00 ($10.00 if you have your own skates) and we put you through some basics. You’ll be introduced to the people who run the league and to all the amazing coaches who will be physically torturing you, while you have the time of your life. Derby’s a tough, full-contact sport so while we teach you skating fundamentals, we also “gradually” whip you into shape. AND, we offer competitive skating and non-competitive skating, so for those of you who are looking for something different to keep you moving but prefer a house league style of play, we’ve got you covered.

So what are you waiting for? Sign up. Right here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dDJBdTJXMm80M2NkWEJDWGNXcEtiQUE6MQ

Dig up your bike helmet, borrow some elbow and knee pads and steal some wrist guards. Fill a bottle of water. Pack your ID and health card. If you’ve got skates, you should bring those. If not…when you registered, you told us your shoes size and there will be skates waiting for you. Wear whatever you want…but if you wear shorts, get some leggings on so that you don’t risk rink rash.

IT’S JUST THAT EASY. No more delays. Bring a friend for moral support…we fully encourage spectators.

For those of you who are all like, “SCREW YOUR OPEN HOUSE! I JUST WANNA SIGN UP!” Well, go right ahead: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dFZSak82Um5KU0I1MTN2bXk2Y21DOHc6MQ#gid=0

Questions? Email us at capitalcityderbydolls@gmail.com.

Wanna stalk us? Awesome. Here’s how:

www.capitalcityderbydolls.com

www.facebook.com/capitalcityderbydolls

@CCDerbyDolls

Stop thinking…just click on the sign-up link. What’s the worst that can happen? You fall on your ass? Great. I spent all season doing that in front of spectators. So come one out. Have fun. Do something different. And be a part of something totally awesome.

xo

Delicate Plow’her

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Season Closer

I can’t believe that summer’s wrapping up. Cooler nights have snuck in and the A/C barely runs. ALL OF WHICH IS AWESOME FOR DERBY. Seriously, arenas are not air conditioned in the summer so the fans get hot and smelly, which kind of makes the players feel a little less self-conscious. So, even though our last home game is this SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 at 7:00 P.M. at the JEAN-MARC LALONDE ARENA in Rockland on 1450 DU PARC AVE, we’re excited to be playing in slightly more tolerable conditions.

CCDD’s Dolly Rogers will be taking on the Oz Roller Girls. It’ll be a first meeting for these teams, but they have similar records so it’ll be a tight bout…and that’s exactly what the people wanna see. So. COME ON OUT. Watch some awesome derby before we pack it in for the winter and start training new players.

Suicide seating available: bring a chair if you wanna get comfy.

We are sponsored by Beau’s Beer. Bring ID for access to the Beer Garden.

Tickets: $10 in advance, $5 for kiddies under 10. If you’d like to buy at the door, it’ll be $12, $7 for the under 10s.

See you there!

xo

Plow’her

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Cooperation at its finest

Saturday, August 18, 2012, started off as a game day for CCDD’s Dolly Rogers. They were supposed to pack their gear and head to Kingston to play the Kingston Derby Girls’ (KDG) Skateful Dead. In other derby news, the Greater Toronto Area’s (GTAR) Derby Debutantes were supposed to travel to Ottawa and play Rideau Valley Roller Girls’ (RVRG) Riot Squad on Saturday, August 18, 2012. Both of these games would have been blow-outs. No disrespect intended here: the Skateful Dead are KDG’s second B team and the Debutantes are GTAR’s B team. The Dolly Rogers beat KDG’s other B team by a significant margin earlier in the season and while a great time was had by all, there was a skills gap. Due to roster changes, the Debutantes found themselves with quite a few new players and at a tournament in July, the Debutantes lost to a CCDD-Limestone Crushers mash-up team of new players, strongly suggesting a skills gap between the Debs and Riot Squad that would make for a predictable game. The teams involved were pretty unaware of the similar situations facing both teams, until the Ottawa men’s derby team got talking about their game, which is also on August 18. Busy day. Thing about the men’s team is that two of it’s players are CCDD’s head coach and head ref. If they’re in Kingston, how’s the men’s game going to happen?

Enter Red. CCDD’s coach.

He looked at the facts and concluded the following:

1. the Dolly Rogers are going to beat Kingston;

2. Riot Squad is going to beat the Debutantes; and

3. there can be no men’s game if the men are scattered around the province coaching/reffing their respective women’s games.

The solution: pretty obvious. The Debs play the Skateful Dead. Riot Squad and the Dolly Rogers stay in Ottawa. The men’s game is on. We call this an ideal solution. Blow-outs are no fun. They’re great for the players because the learning opportunity is priceless, but the crowd is not so entertained. Moreover, it’s hard to raise the profile of men’s derby when the men can’t have a game. Finally, there’s so much great derby in this city that why travel when you can have a helluva night right in your own city?

Perfect.

Except that GTAR can’t roster a team for Kingston. And the Skateful Dead need an opponent. And it’s on us to do something about it. And so something is exactly what we did. We asked our newer players how they felt about bouting, and following a positive response from a number of players, we were on our way to a roster. But there were still gaps that needed to be filled; gaps that are being filled by RVRG. There are still some details to sort out, but August 18th is turning out to be quite a day:

1. RVRG is playing CCDD;

2. the men’s team is made up of CCDD and RVRG members (our boys count as league members); and

3. CCDD and RVRG are playing together in Kingston.

This is the truest sense of cooperation. For those of you who don’t play derby or know much about its history in Ottawa, things haven’t always been this easy. In fact, it’s been a long, hard road but this last year, with its freezing cold practices out in Rockland, represented a noticeable shift in derby culture in Ottawa. The development of a friendship off the track, the opportunity to nurture a healthy and positive rivalry on the track, and the fostering of a sense of team cooperation in Kingston make August 18 a great day.

Don’t miss it. BUY TICKETS TODAY.

See you there!

xo Plow’her

Brewer Brouhaha

Best night of your life!

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Derby Blow-outs

They totally happen.

The Dolly Rogers were on the other side of a blow-out at the end of last season. The experience was mostly humbling. We were finishing an extraordinary first season and frankly, we needed to learn a little lesson. Getting that badly beaten showed us that not only was it important to consider what we’d achieved all season, but that we needed to establish some goals based on what are truly endless possibilities. Witnessing some of those possibilities helped us gain a lot of focus, which brought new meaning to our winter training. But this is derby. And the sport is still in its infancy. And the tools that track what teams are doing are still rudimentary. There are no divisions, no classes, no in-depth rankings and no standard training approaches. It’s not for a lack of effort; there are lots of amazing people out there, painstakingly tracking games, scores, trying to centralize information and attempting to develop more sophisticated means of painting a clearer picture of the derby scene. But despite all the work, there are still mismatches. As much as these mismatches are great for teams, they’re not so amazing for the spectator. And because we depend so heavily on revenue from games to bring us through our winter training, we’re not exactly in a position to mess with spectators. So when we plan our season, we try to schedule close games.

Enter our inter-league liaison, Eastern Block’her. She has a tough job. She’s responsible for finding teams willing to travel to Ottawa. She starts this in January, because that’s when we apply to the City of Ottawa for space. Ottawa typically doesn’t get back to us until April so Eastern has to balance the teams willing to come to Ottawa with the dates the City eventually gets back to us on and the dates these teams can travel on. Moreover, when finding these teams, Eastern doesn’t have many tools at her disposal to determine whether the game will be close enough to be interesting…or not. There’s still months of training ahead, there are only a few past scores, some basic rankings, but as we’ve all experienced first-hand, these things don’t mean much. We’ve gone from 12th to 47th to 37th to 26th in the flat track rankings in a matter of weeks. Take our last game against Peterborough. Our leagues got off the ground around the same time. Peterborough had a great coach from the start. We were coachless for months and we didn’t even have enough players to roster a team until DAYS before our first season started. Things fell into place quickly with us. We got a coach and managed to get through a season. CCDD and Peterborough are into their respective second seasons. Both teams have new players. On paper, it looked like a good match and that’s the best we could do. Peterborough was awesome. They played right until the final whistle went. They fell, they got right back up. They laughed and joked on the line and said wonderful things to us during and after the game. They took the whole experience as a learning one. All around, both teams were pretty happy and the after-party had a happy and positive tone.

But, we got some tweets about maybe having a closer game next time. Which is fair. Because when you’re coming to see a game, it’s so much better when you have NO idea what’s going to happen until the last few seconds. And it’s what we try to do, because for us, as much as the basic rankings mean a lot to us, and can represent a point of pride, the ranking system is not sophisticated enough to recognize what happens when you beat a team that should have creamed you. It doesn’t take into account how long you’ve been playing. Or even how many games you’ve played. If you’ve only played one game and you won by 500 points, you’ll stay at the top all season. So, while we’re paying attention to where we are, we don’t want to set-up a season that involves huge and easy wins. We’re not going to improve if we don’t challenge ourselves and we’re not going to promote any sustained interest in a sport if we routinely steam roll the competition.

We appreciate the tremendous support we’ve had this year from Ottawa residents. The word on roller derby is getting louder. We have great crowds at our games, we have great support from sponsors and local businesses who’ve put up our posters and offered to sell tickets for us. We had SuzieQ Doughnuts, the Merry Dairy truck, and Beau’s Beer at our last game and this desire to get involved in derby gives us a lot of hope for the future. Every game we play gives our supporters the opportunity to learn more about a sport that’s growing every day. It’s not an easy sport to wrap your head around, but once you’ve seen a bout, you gain a rapid understanding of the intense strategy and physical demands posed by roller derby. Ottawa, we appreciate your support and our next game will be something special. We played a team a year ago at a tournament in Moncton. We spent most of the game down by some serious points, when suddenly, we came back and went on to win by a very narrow margin. The ladies from the Fog City Rollers want a rematch. We don’t blame them. It could have gone either way. They’re travelling all the way from St. John, New Brunswick, to set the record straight. On Saturday, September 8, we’ll be facing each other again at the Jean-Marc Lalonde Arena in Rockland. Yeah, Rockland is a bit of a drive, but they don’t flood their surface in the winter so we can play on a concrete slab. We practised there all winter and the Rockland community is really looking forward to having a game in their neck of the woods.

We still have quite a season ahead of us. You can learn all about us at our brand new website. We still haven’t loaded all the potential content, but it’s on its way. You can also check out our facebook page and follow our twitter feed.

www.capitalcityderbydolls.com

CCDD on facebook

Our Twitter handle @CCDerbyDolls

xo Plow’her

Dolly Rogers

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